Alcohol Misconceptions: Can Alcoholism be Cured?

Alcohol Misconceptions: Can Alcoholism be Cured?

If they can’t stay within those limits, they need to stop drinking altogether. Are you trying to drink less or stop drinking completely? You doctor also can refer you to a treatment center or experts who can help. An important first step is to learn more about alcohol use disorder and your treatment options. In addition to choosing the type of treatment that’s best for you, you’ll also have to decide if that treatment is inpatient (you would stay at a facility) or outpatient (you stay in your home during treatment).

Drugs used for other conditions — like smoking, pain, or epilepsy — also may help with alcohol use disorder. Talk to your doctor to see of one of those might be right for you. Some people just need a short, focused counseling session. Others may want one-on-one therapy for a longer time to deal with issues like anxiety or depression. Alcohol use can have a big effect on the people close to you, so couples or family therapy can help, too.

Management and Treatment

The one that’s right for you depends on your situation and your goals. Many people find that a combination of treatments works best, and you can get them together through a program. Some of these are inpatient or residential programs, where you stay at a treatment center for a while. Others are outpatient programs, where you live at home and go to the center for treatment. Based on clinical experience, many health providers believe that support from friends and family members is important in overcoming alcohol problems.

Is alcoholism a mental disorder?

In 1980, the third edition of the Manual, DSM-3, identified alcoholism as a subset of a mental health disorder. The current edition, DSM-5, classifies alcoholism, now referred to as Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) or Substance Use Disorder (SUD), as a mental disorder presenting both physical and mental symptoms.

Like these other diseases, alcoholism tends to run in the family. “Chronic” means that it lasts for a long time or comes back often. The main treatment for alcoholism is to stop drinking alcohol. This can be difficult, because most people who are alcoholics feel a strong desire for alcohol when they stop drinking. Partial hospitalization programs (PHPs) are outpatient programs that function much like inpatient programs but without the residential requirement. Clients in these programs participate in recovery-related programming during the day, including counseling, therapy, and even medication assistance, but may return home in the evenings.

Types of Professionals Involved in Care

Management can take many forms, but the focus is on maintaining a sober life and preventing relapse. To avoid relapsing, there are many treatment options for alcoholics to find a personalized path toward a healthier and brighter future. If you’re a long-term, heavy drinker, you may need medically supervised detoxification. Detox can be done on an outpatient basis or in a hospital or alcohol treatment facility, where you may be prescribed medication to prevent medical complications and relieve withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor or an addiction specialist to learn more. The fact is that recovering from an addiction to alcohol isn’t easy.

Alcohol-related problems—which result from drinking too much, too fast, or too often—are among the most significant public health issues in the United States. Other mutual support groups include Refuge Recovery, Women for Sobriety, and All Recovery. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many mutual support groups are now available online, which makes them more accessible to people regardless of their location.

Tips for finding the best addiction treatment

“Is there a cure for alcoholism” is a common question among many, including those dealing with addiction as well as loved ones and friends who might be trying to help someone with the disease. Though there may be no easy “cure” for alcoholism, or alcohol use disorder, the condition is treatable. Ongoing treatment and continued recovery efforts can be helpful in successfully managing alcoholism and preventing relapse in the long term. Read on to learn more about the disease of alcoholism and how it is treated.

alcohol and dopamine

AA is a faith-based program that incorporates religion of all kinds into its framework. It started through the friendship between a physician (Bob Smith, aka Dr. Bob) and a businessman (Bill Wilson, aka Bill W). At the time, most people might have dismissed their alcohol dependence. However, both of them struggled with maintaining a normal life and their relationship with alcohol.

Support can come from family members, friends, counselors, other recovering alcoholics, your healthcare providers, and people from your faith community. The drug had to be prescribed off label (that is, not for its original medical use), which health authorities frowned at. At that point, they’re unable to control their alcohol use which can permanently ruin their health. Plus, we have alcoholism recovery statistics on our side to back that up. Read on to find out how evidence-based programs and strong support can help people with AUD get their life back on track. Medicines are usually used with talk therapy and support groups to treat alcohol use disorder.

Inpatient rehab provides a safe place for people to focus on their recovery and develop life skills to support sobriety after completing the program. Naltrexone, acamprosate, and disulfiram are often given to recovering alcoholics to ease withdrawal symptoms. All of these medications are available only through an approved doctor. Three oral medications — disulfiram (Antabuse®), naltrexone (Depade®, ReVia®) and acamprosate (Campral®) — are currently approved to treat alcohol dependence. In addition, an injectable, long-acting form of naltrexone (Vivitrol®) is available.

Some people are able to stop drinking on their own or with the help of a 12-step program or other support group (see below for links). Others need medical supervision in order to withdraw from alcohol safely and comfortably. Which option is best for you depends on how much you’ve been drinking, how long you’ve had a problem, the stability of your living situation, and other health issues you may have.

can alcoholism be cured

Because that is, according to all other schools of thought, simply impossible. Millions of readers rely on HelpGuide.org for free, evidence-based resources to understand and navigate mental health challenges. Please donate today to help us save, support, and change lives. Alcohol https://ecosoberhouse.com/article/can-alcoholism-be-cured/ recovery is a process—one that often involves setbacks. A drinking relapse doesn’t mean you’re a failure or that you’ll never be able to reach your goal. Each drinking relapse is an opportunity to learn and recommit to sobriety, so you’ll be less likely to relapse in the future.